In this CDI seminar, James Copestake will introduce the QuIP and explain how and why it combines features of causal process tracing, outcome harvesting and realist evaluation while addressing confirmation bias and confirmability problems associated with much qualitative social research.
22 March 2018 - 1:00pm
Speaker(s): James Copestake

The Qualitative Impact Protocol (QuIP) was developed through DFID-ESRC sponsored action research with field testing conducted on rural livelihood and climate adaptation projects in Ethiopia and Malawi. It has since been applied in a wide range of contexts across more than ten countries. It elicits how the intended beneficiaries of development activities explain changes in their wellbeing.

In this CDI seminar, James Copestake will introduce the QuIP and explain how and why it combines features of causal process tracing, outcome harvesting and realist evaluation while addressing confirmation bias and confirmability problems associated with much qualitative social research. He will also position the QuIP in relation to debate over mixed methods, positionality and development managerialism.

Whether you’re a constructivist, critical realist or unreconstructed positivist this is not one to be missed! 

About the speaker

James Copestake is Professor of International Development at the University of Bath. In addition to qualitative impact evaluation his recent work has addressed contested perceptions of wellbeing in Peru, financial incorporation in India, the interface between social policy and development studies, and the use of challenge funds in aid management.

 

Location:
Convening Space
Institute of Development Studies, Library Road
BN1 9RE Falmer
United Kingdom
GB
Partner(s): Institute of Development Studies
Public - open to all

Key contact

Director of the Centre for Development Impact